The Weight Loss Code

Have you hit that stage in life when your body just doesn't seem to want to cooperate anymore?

The food you used to eat now ends up on your hips or around your waistline, and the exercise you used to do just doesn't work anymore at taking that weight off. Your body is storing a little extra fat, year after year and you have no clue what to do about it.

Sound familiar? That's what The Weight Loss Code was all about...

Weight Loss Code

Jennifer Powter, put together The Weight Loss Code as a way to bring together some of the world's top weight-loss experts in one amazing event.

I was excited to be one of the headline speakers, and had an important message to share about the effects of exercise on weight-loss results.

WARNING: What you're about to hear goes against most mainstream "wisdom" when it comes to exercising for fat-loss. Some people might not like to hear what I had to share, but this message is a much-needed one.

If you're a woman over the age of 40 and you'd like to try a new approach to exercise that will produce dramatic results, this interview is for you. Watch below:

Interview Resources:

Interested to learn more about what we discussed on this episode? Here are some important resources for you:

The Weight Loss Code [Full Text]

Jen:

Hey everybody, welcome back to another interview on The Weight Loss Code Masterclass Series. It's healthy, permanent weight loss for women over 40. That is what we are talking about. I'm your host Jen Powder, and my special guest expert today is Dave Smith, from makeyourbodywork.com.

Hey Dave.

Dave:                      

Hey Jen, super excited to be here with you guys.

Jen:                          

Thank you, I'm super excited you're here too. So if you haven't met Dave in my community before, or haven't heard of his podcast you need to check it out. We've actually had a few conversations now, and Dave one of the reasons I was so excited to bring you into this series is, your take on things.

Right now I believe that you are coming at fitness and exercise for women with kind of a contra culture approach right now and it's fascinating. Because it's showing that there's not just one way to go about getting healthy or getting fit or losing weight.

Dave:                      

Yeah, 100% and Jen it actually it starts with my own personal story. So, a quick little story, I'm not sure if you know this or if your listeners do, but I went through two catastrophic injuries in my earlier years.

Jen:                          

I didn't know this.

Dave:                      

About 10 years ago, so I was just about early 30s maybe, late 20s early 30s. I completely destroyed my knee, so I tore my ACL, tore my cartilage, tore my meniscus. This is coming from a place of being quite a competitive athlete. So I was just devastated, because all of the training that I was used to doing, suddenly it was gone.

Jen:                          

Yeah.

Dave:                      

I couldn't exercise that way anymore. So, I went through about a year of rehab, got myself back up, went back into the training, was determined to come back and be that athlete again. I did the exact same thing to the exact same knee.

Jen:                          

Oh my God, Dave.

Dave:                      

It was, honestly I'm a pretty positive person. But I actually think that I went through a period of depression because my whole life was built around serving people, helping people exercise in a certain way and doing it myself. It was completely robbed from me. So, I went through the second surgical procedure and came out the other side, and my surgeon was like, "There is no way you're going back to doing the type of training that you were doing before."

So this was a big eye opener for me, because not only did I have to discover a new way for me to train but I started to think about, I was training hundreds and hundreds of women. We were using sort of the typical type of style of exercise that you'd see in boot camps. You know high intensity interval training and that's what I strongly believed led to some of my problems and led to my knee surgeries.

Jen:                          

Okay, so I want to stop just one second right there, because this is fascinating. Because here's where I'm taking this for a woman, right? So a lot of my clients if they're moms, like me, or if somehow careers have gotten busy, so it's not necessarily a catastrophic injury that sidelines them from their normal type of exercise or the ability to have endless hours to train. It might just simply be life events.

So, you're saying like, right? To sort of parallel this a little bit. So that same experience could be like, somebody like me 43, who I'm like, "Wow, 10 years ago I used to have all the time in the world and could train." Then, I don't anymore, and now I'm de-trained and hurts to train like that, and so HIT training, and it's so ... so what we're talking about today is the concept of HIT training versus something different which you're going to explain to us.

Dave:                      

Yeah, 100% ...

Jen:                          

I think you were just about to.

Dave:                      

Well, that was a perfect segue to where I was going with this story, is that I started to look at the fitness classes that I was running, and the personal training clients who I was working with. We were working under that premise that, it has to be harder, it has to be more intense and that that's going to burn more fat and get better results.

Coming out of a place where it had completely backfired for me, I started to think, I was a highly trained, highly conditioned athlete and this ruined my body. What can I expect for, like you said, a mom who's 45 years old who perhaps hasn't been training in 20 years or maybe has never been training? Is this actually the way that we should be approaching exercise?

So, over the last 10 years, I know you and many of the other viewers right now, you've seen all these workout programs and I don't need to name ...

Jen:                          

Insanity, P-90X, come on let's name them, T-25, right? Like, go to beachbody.com and there's awesome, I mean it's great to have these home workouts. I taught many of these high intensity interval classes.

Dave:                      

Me too.

Jen:                          

Right, so yeah we've done it, and there's impact.

Dave:                      

Totally, and there is a time and a place for that style of exercise, and for some people that's great, they enjoy it. But I would say, if I were to put a percentage on it. I would say over 90% of women in particular, not only don't need that style of training, but it's actually going take them further away from their goals. Maybe, I'm sure we'll get into talking about why that's true.

Jen:                          

Well let's go over there right now. Just to pause on this for one second. So for everybody watching and listening, so I, like Dave, loved exercise, it was ... I like exercise, many women at my age don't. They don't have good experiences with it.

But I just started training again after being de-trained for quite some time. I ached from head to toe. Like, every muscle was like finger touch sore. Like, I couldn't even, if my husband rolled over in bed, I was like, "Don't touch me." Because I hurt. Not a lot of people want to feel that way.

Dave:                      

Well not a lot of people want to feel that way, some people do, it's sort of become this badge of honour. If you're an exerciser and you came away and you really hurt from a workout, you say, "Well I crushed it in that workout." But, that's your body's response telling you something. When your body is that sore there is no way that you should be going back into the gym and repeating that.

So, when you look at some of these exercise programs, like the ones you mentioned that are literally every day programs, there's just, like scientifically there's no way that that's good for your body. So, research wise, I'm not going to get all like, nerdy and science here, talk about all the numbers and facts and everything. But one important stat is, for high intensity interval training, research has absolutely proven the most a body can handle in one week is 40 minutes.

So, think about this. Quite often HIT training workouts will promote themselves as being super quick. So, maybe they'll be 20 minutes. What that tells me is that, at most there's opportunity for two of those workouts per week.

Jen:                          

Right.

Dave:                      

Think about in your own training and when you taught classes. Would you say that women were doing it more than twice per week?

Jen:               

Yeah, and lots of those classes were, yeah, I would say so. I think that that's been like, exercise really hard for just 20 minutes. Get it in, get it done, get it done every day. That, you know it's appealing because it's a shorter time frame, but if you are un-conditioned or a not fit person and you try to do that, not only does it crush your body, it crushes your self esteem.

Like, let's talk about the effect on the psychology, you know it takes so much motivation to even get yourself to doing something, if you've been doing nothing for a while. Then you do that and halfway through you feel like you're dying. Like, it feels like lose-lose, not win-win.

Dave:                      

It really isn't. So, as a former personal trainer I saw these two camps. I saw one group of women who had dedicated themselves to exercise. They were going to the gym and they were busting their butts over and over and over again. The end result of that is body breakdown and eventually injury. I'll tell you something, if you're trying to lose weight, there's no better way to stop the weight loss process than to get injured. Because then you can't exercise.

Jen:                          

Now you've got an excuse.

Dave:                      

Exactly, so that's camp number one. Camp number two are people who don't like to exercise but have heard and have seen that the only way to have effective exercise is to do this sort of high intensity training and they hate it. So they, in their minds have told themselves, "I am not an exerciser. I cannot exercise. I don't like to exercise." So I really think that both groups are being done a disservice by this popular form of exercise that we just see so much in the media right now.

Jen:                          

Okay, so what I'm going to be ... so obviously this is leading somewhere, right? What's the alternative, Dave? Like if it's not HIIT, then what?

Dave:                      

Well, so the other popular alternative when you think way back, probably in the '70s or '80s, it was something called LISS. LISS L-I-S-S stands for Low Intensity Steady State exercise. So you can think about, I think about in the '80s women would wear their neon sort of jumpsuits and carry their little two pound weights and go out and power walk. They'd power walk in their group ...

Jen:                          

Oh my gosh, the videos are awesome that show exercise classes from the past, yeah.

Dave:                      

Totally, and the idea is that you do something that's very low intensity but do it for a very long period of time.

Jen:                          

Right.

Dave:                      

So there is some benefit to that because, say we were to go out and walk. Say Jen, you and I started a walking group, and we walked every single day. The chance of us getting injured is very low.

The chances of us needing recovery time, like HIIT requires is non-existent. We could walk every and never need a break. So those are two positive things.

Jen:                          

Right.

Dave:                      

The downside of that style of exercise is that there's nothing really pushing your body forward. There's no impetus for your body to change. So you think about, say we walked for 30 minutes and we did that for six weeks. Eventually 30 minutes is going to feel pretty easy.

Even if we had never exercised before. So we could up that to 45 minutes, and we could do that for the next four or six weeks. Then to an hour, and then to an hour and a half and eventually it like, where is this leading to? Are we eventually going to be walking like six hours per day?

Jen:                          

Yeah, well that's just it. Because you're talking about the principle of progressive overload.

Dave:                      

Exactly.

Jen:                          

Right? Our bodies adapt, and this is something that's critical for our viewers and listeners to really understand with the body. First of all, when you do nothing, your body adapts to doing nothing. Right? So you lose the beneficial training responses, you know and that comes from mitochondria production, red blood cell formation. All these things that are happening when you exercise, they stop happening when you don't exercise. Right, so you get used to it that way.

So, how do you bring in to LISS, this concept of progressive overload. Because really we're talking about two extremes. HIT/LISS ...

Dave:                      

Exactly, and so we need something in the middle and that something in the middle is what I call LIFL, L-I-F-L and it's Low Intensity Fat Loss. It's exactly what we just talked about. Sort of taking the benefits of HIT, the best of HIT and combining it with the best of LISS. So what does that look like? 

Well, from a cardiovascular standpoint the entire goal is 2%, and I teach all my clients this. Just think about moving your body for 2% of your day. Do the calculation, 2% of 24 hours, it's 30 minutes. Like, we know this, we know that we need to get moving 2%.

But you talk about progressive overload, how can we add something in that's actually going to challenge our body to change. Because like we said, if we go out and walk for 2% per day, eventually our body's going to stop seeing benefit.

So the idea behind Low Intensity Fat Loss is to take some strength training principles and introduce those in different types of ways with that LISS cardio. So, an example would be there's something that I like to call a strength sandwich. What it is, is some strength training. Just some simple full body movements. That would maybe take like, four or five minutes. Then to go in to continue with your cardio training. So going and walking for 25 or 30 minutes. Then finishing with some strength exercises. So you can see that sandwich effect. We've got strength, we've got strength and we've got cardio in the middle.

The advantage of doing something like that, so that's just one way to practice this LIFL principle, the advantage of that is we're building some muscle with those strength sessions at the start and the end of your cardiovascular training.

That's really important Jen, you know this because as we do strength training what does it do? It adds muscle to our frame and when we add muscle to our frame, our metabolism goes up. Again, like research is, it's sort of all over the map in how much muscle actually increases your metabolism, but somewhere between 30 to 60 calories per pound of muscle.

So you think about that, I always challenge women with this. Think about how powerful it would be if you added five pounds of muscle to your body. So do that calculation. Five pounds of muscle, we'll go on conservative level here, and say that's 30 calories per pounds of muscle. So that's 150 calories your body is burning every single day just by being you. That's like doing absolutely nothing. Just by being alive.

Jen:                          

Right.

Dave:                      

If you made that 10 pounds, that's 300 calories. So this idea of LIFL, adding some strength training to your cardiovascular training without going to the extremes of HIT, it's the perfect way to increase your metabolism without having that body breakdown, without having the risk for injury, without needing huge recovery and really nailing home that 2% habit, every single day.

Jen:                          

Do you know what I like about this approach too? Is it's psychologically gentle, right? Like if I know that I can literally start my strength ... what did you call it? Strength training ...

Dave:                      

It's a strength sandwich.

Jen:                          ​

Strength sandwich. Yeah, but for me it could be, or for anybody listening, if you were not active right now and you're coming on to this series to learn what can you do? Today, tomorrow, to start, to start now.

You're literally saying that you could do three sets of 20 squats, right? Body weight squats, three sets, take a little break, do another set. Then head out for that 20 minute walk. Come back, maybe do some lunges, maybe do some push-ups against the wall, and you're done. No gym, no equipment, no incredible muscle soreness the next day but yet enough of an impetus to cause some adaptation.

Dave:                      

Yeah 100% and there's a reason why people aren't doing more of this. I strongly believe it's because we've been told that it's not enough. The analogy that I'll quite often use when people have that mentality is, they'll think, "Well am I really going to see a change if I do a workout."

Just like you just described, Jen. You know what, you probably aren't in a week. But I'll compare it to brushing our teeth. You imagine if someone said, "You know what? I really want clean teeth. I want a whiter smile." So they brush their teeth 20 times in one day. Then they were like, "Yes, I crushed it, my teeth are so clean." Then they didn't brush their teeth for the next five days. Then they got all motivated again and brushed their teeth 20 times.

Compare that person to someone who did, as we do, brushing our teeth three or four times a day, over the course of our lifetime. Who's going to have a healthier smile? We would never dispute that. But for some reason in exercise, people feel this need, "Well I'm going to ramp it up. I'm going to do this crazy exercise class. I'm going to exercise seven days a week at the gym, and my body's going to feel awful. Then you know what? I'm going to crash and burn.-

Jen:                          

I'm going to quit.

Dave:                  

Because mentally and physically I can't sustain that." Who's going to get better results? The person who's doing this? Or the person who's doing this?

Jen:                          

Oh, 100% David. That's such a great metaphor. Like, the habit building around it, right? Like, luckily when we're little we have parents who nag us to brush our teeth. I know I nag my kids.

So somehow, but you know it's a good thing because if you brush your teeth once and then don't do it for six months, like you feel disgusting inside your mouth, right? Well when you only exercise once or if you exercise three or four times and think you're going see or feel radical change in that week, you don't. It's the consistency over time that allows that feeling to come, right? Would you agree?

Dave:                      

Yeah, again 100%. You know the brushing your teeth analogy, it works on so many levels. I think back to, I specifically remember in fourth grade we had a dental hygienist come into our class. She was doing a little thing, like showing us how to brush our teeth, and showing us how to floss and everything. She said, you know what? I know you guys probably don't like brushing your teeth right now. But when I go into the grade six class, they all want to know this stuff. I remember as a kid thinking, "Well why is that?" Then she described it, and she said, "Because in grade six, that's when you really start noticing the opposite sex."

So, it was so interesting because those grade sixers, they all of a sudden had, Jen you and I have talked about this all the time, the reason why. They had a reason why they were brushing their teeth, and it was because they didn't want bad breath, they didn't want ugly teeth, they wanted to have a nice smile, they wanted to impress the opposite sex.

Think about us as adults. It's the exact same thing. We go through these spikes because we don't really have a good why. We have a moment where we think, "I need to get in shape." But then that's a fleeting moment, and all of a sudden this work, this effort, this pain that we went through it's no longer justifying that why.

Instead, we need to get to that 2% of doing effective exercise, which I say is LIFL and knowing the why behind it, that's going to continually motivate us to do that for life. Not just for this week or this month.

Jen:                          

So, I had about five questions or statements that came up during that. It was around the mindset and the psychology of it, right? Like, so those grade sixers have the idea of, you know healthy breath, clean breath because they might get a crush or something. You know when we are trying to figure out how to get healthier. It's never the lack of knowledge, Dave.

You and I have clients who, they know this stuff, right? They know. But there's a gap sometimes between knowing and doing, or knowing and doing it forever.

So we have people who can start/stop, and that can go with yo-yo dieting or yo-yo exercising. Right, like the binge hard and then get hurt, or get injured. Now permission to not exercise, which for some people is relief. Because they have more time in their day. So where do you tap into that why? What do you tell your clients? Like what is it?

If people are watching and listening to this, there is something going on for them, right? They're here watching because they want to change something with their health or their weight.

Dave:                      

Um-hmm (affirmative).

Jen:                          

How do they access the why?

Dave:                      

That's a fantastic question, especially that last question, how do they access the why? I think it comes through community and conversation. So it's really hard for anyone, myself included, to just sit down and think hard enough to come up with my real reason why. I don't know many people who are intuit enough or in touch with themselves enough to do that, but it does come out in conversation. Jen, if you and I started talking through you know, things we were struggling with in life, by having you ask me the right questions the answers would come out.

So that's my encouragement to people who are watching this. If you've struggled with being dedicated to exercise and if you hear me say, it's just 2%, 30 minutes a day. You think, I've tried that before Dave, and it didn't work. I'd encourage you to have a conversation with someone.

Whether it's your spouse or it's your friend or a family member and start to talk about, well, what are the reasons that you've tried it in the past? What are the reasons you're trying it right now? What was it in the past that prevented you from continuing with that 2% exercise? If it was because you tried something that was too intense, maybe that's the only solution that you need. Maybe doing it differently this time just means scaling back that intensity and knowing that this is better than this.

But once you know your why, and you know what's caused you to deviate from your goals in the past, it's pretty easy to develop a solution that will actually work.

Jen:                          

Dave, what about for our listeners and viewers watching right now who might be in a real life rut? Or like, really crazy busy? Right? Let's go two places here. Because both of, the common denominator there is this belief that I either don't have the time, or I just can't find it within myself to even get off my couch or get off the office ... can you break that 2% into two 1% chunks? Can you do 15 minutes?

Dave:                      

Oh 100%.

Jen:                          

Like, if you can't start at 30 because that just seems so long, so big, so hard what's the impact? Does it matter? Is it okay to go, you know what? Once in the morning, once at night, like I brush my teeth.

Dave:                      

Or once in the morning. Go for 1%.

Jen:                          

Or start once, yeah.

Dave:                      

1% for sure, that's 100% true. So one of the groups of women that I'm working with right now, we were evaluating our diet and we were talking about vegetable intake. Our goal is, so we're going for a big goal here, is nine servings of vegetables per day. One of the women in the group, just yesterday, she commented, we have a tracking sheet and every single day her number is four or five.

She said, "Wow this has been so eye opening to me because I would have said I'm someone that eats vegetables all the time. But I can't get past this four or five." She was actually down on herself a little bit, and I said, "Well okay, how about your goal then, forget the nine, because that sounds like that's actually impossible right now. Let's fix your goal. Once you nail six then we'll make seven."

I know this sounds easy, but it's really important that we give ourself leniency and we give ourself a little bit of love and a little bit of grace to say that, "I'm going here but right now I'm here. There are many intermediary steps that are going to get me here, it doesn't need to happen in a day, a week, a month or maybe even a year, but I'm going to get there."

Jen:                          

That's the consistent baby step. Like you and I, like right? That's why we're always so aligned. No matter what kind of work, it's like, do one thing, do one thing and get consistent at it and then add on just a little bit more, right? I look at people at the gym and I see women, I'm not very good at squats, I don't squat a lot of weight. I see some women who can like, they squat a lot of weight. I think, "Wow." If I tried to go do what they were doing right now, I'd be injured. Like I would be like stuck on the floor, I'm not kidding.

So, I know if I want to change, I've got to do small changes over time. That's really what makes a difference. What you're saying there too, is it builds up the confidence, right? Confidence creates momentum and that creates movement.

Dave:                      

The word mastery, and you and I have talked about this before. I want all of my clients and all of the women who are watching right now to come away saying, "I can be a master of exercise." I know that's going to sound weird. I often, when I have talks like this or when I do presentations, I think back to my mom.

My mom, she's actually a petite woman now, but she's battled weight ever since she was a kid and she's not super-coordinated, she never liked sports and she has it in her mind or in the past had it in her mind that she is not an exerciser. That's because she's comparing herself to other people who are "exercisers."

So I want everyone who's watching this to really believe me when I say, you can be a master at exercising. If you're just starting out, let's use LISS. Low Intensity Steady State, and for you that might be walking for 1% of your day. Anyone can do that. Then 2% of your day, and then start to introduce some of this Low Intensity Fat Loss training, like Jen and I have been talking about. Starting to do some of that resistance training. So it's a progression. But you can be a master right now, by getting up and walking for 1% of your day.

Jen:                          

Yeah, it puts you ahead of most of the population who isn't doing that right? So it's like comparing yourself to the Olympics, right? Like, anybody who's training that way, we're never going to be like that, and that's not the goal.

So, when you, I really want to tap into your expertise around exercise and especially using healthy exercise for healthy fat loss. Because what I see a lot of is an unhealthy yet, unhealthy use of exercise. So too hard, too much, too stressful, too much in a week. To create unhealthy fat loss. Right?

So really quick fat loss, living on no calories, probably having your hormones ... so what is, if you don't do it that way, because that's one of the prescribes methods, right? Just move more. Move more, exercise harder, that's going to be the answer to your weight loss problem.

I haven't seen that to be true yet with my clients. If they do that, they usually gain it back the minute that they stop exercising or they get sick, or their kids get sick, or work gets busy. What's the other option there? How do you create this ...

Dave:                      

It's like what we've been talking about. It really is keep it simple. So in terms of the principles that I teach in Low Intensity Fat Loss, it's the 2% and then it's your six primal movements. So quite often you see people that are busting their butt in the gym but, I've fallen into this too, we all like to work on what's called our mirror muscles. Those are the muscles on the front side of our body that we look at.

Jen:                          

Beach weights.

Dave:                      

Exactly, exactly, exactly. The problem with that is, not only are we going to get lopsided, maybe you've seen people in the gym like that who've done way too much bench press or whatever and walk around with this hunch. But, we're setting ourselves up for injury. Remember at the start of this interview I said, "What's the number one way to stop any progress that you've had? It's to get injured."

Jen:                          

Yeah.

Dave:                      

So keep it simple. It's, like I said 2% is our goal moving our body.

Jen:                          

30 minutes a day.

Dave:                      

Then once you get into actually doing some resistance training, it's your six primal movements. I'll go through those super quickly.

Jen:                          

Okay, awesome.

Dave:                      

So, think about prehistorically, man is built, our body is built to do six movements. We're built to squat, we're built to lunge, we're built to push, we're built to pull, we're built to bend over, and we're built to twist. So my challenge for anyone who's watching this-

Jen:                          

This is awesome.

Dave:                    

If you are in an exercise program, particularly if you're doing group fitness, because as a group fitness instructor, I can say, group fitness usually is very one dimensional. It's usually very mirror muscle focused. So look at your workout. Are you squatting, are you lunging, are you pushing, are you pulling, are you bending and are you twisting? If you're not, you're creating imbalances that are going to lead to injury just like I had. I don't want that for you. So it's about balance, and it's about keeping it simple.

Jen:                          

Oh this is awesome. We're going to have some of these comments you guys in show notes, on the blog. We're going to be taking these interviews and making sure that you have access to the key points that we're covering in here. So don't worry if you're listening while you're driving or scrambling to write things down. We'll bring you back or we'll give you links to hear this stuff.

So, quickly tell me, because I'm thinking, so "Okay, I know squat, lunge." Those are like the names of exercises out there. So most people know what that looks like. Push, pull, so I'm thinking, okay push-ups, right? Pull-ups.

Dave:                      

Yeah, like those ones you're right they are easy because just in the name, it tells you what they are.

Jen:                          

Yeah.

Dave:                      

But a pull-up for example, like most people can't do a pull-up, right?? So, think about pulling is your back muscles. So when you do a pull, like a pull-up you're working your lats, you're working your traps, you're working your rhomboids, so it's replicating that movement or stimulating activity in those muscles.

So an example of one that is accessible for anyone is a pointing dog, is sort of the typical name or like a Superman, where you're doing a back extension on the floor.

Jen:                          

Got it.

Dave:                      

You know Jen, if anyone has questions ask me and I can ...

Jen:                          

They'll come and find you.

Dave:                      

I've got videos that will teach you how to do all this stuff. But those will be some examples. For bending, the typical bending one would be a dead lift in a gym but it also could be, there's an exercise called a good morning where you just practice bending over with a flat back and then straightening back up again. So it's super simple.

Jen:                          

Yeah.

Dave:                      

A twist, same thing, there's all types of exercises. A great core exercise I'll use is a Russian twist, where you're seated on the ground and literally you're just twisting and touching the ground on either side of you. So, again I use that example of a strength sandwich. Think about incorporating some of these six primal movements. You can do three on the front end, three on the back end. Do a little bit of cardio. You've got your 2% of your day.

Just think about if that was like brushing your teeth and you did that every single day. We would have no obesity problem in the world if everyone did that.

Jen:                          

Oh 100%, 100%. So the things that make ... so if you're wondering, right? How do you implement this in your life? A lot of times it's really hard to remain accountable to yourself, especially if you're like me. I think Dave, we've talked about this before, sometimes you need a partner, a class, a group. Somebody you can check in with. Maybe you don't even need somebody to do it with, but somebody that you text at six a.m. to say, "Hey I'm up." Right?

Do something, and then challenge yourself to not just think about the short term win. Really imagine if you were to do this habit for three months, six months, what is possible? Right? I think that's what you're saying. I love your message because it's not about go hard or go home. No pain, no gain. Longer, harder is better. It's not about workout really hard to trade your calories burned for food. Really, right?

We won't even go down that one, we would need another interview. But it really is about, start moving. Take 2%, give yourself permission to find 2% of your day.

Dave:                      

Like, in terms of HIIT training, and I know there's probably some people that are watching this and saying, "Dave, I love my HIIT training, I'm not going to stop." I'm not going to tell you to stop. But I really want you to take away that message. When we talked about the research before, your body's built to do this for 40 minutes per week. So if you're doing anything more than that, like I'd say just think about how you can incorporate some different type of exercise.

If HIIT training like, isn't even on your radar, and you're just starting out with exercise. Awesome, forget HIIT training because you definitely don't need it.

Jen:                          

Awesome, okay, so we want to make sure that absolutely people can find you, get resources, all of the awesome things that you have. So I think I mentioned at the beginning but I might have said it quick. If you haven't checked out Dave's podcast, it's Make Your Body Work, you can find it in iTunes for sure. Then he's got a gift for us...

Dave:                      

Yeah, and I just want to say, so when you go to that link, it's actually going to take you through a diagnostic assessment. So I've created this tool that goes through a series of, I believe it's 38 questions that will help you sort of pinpoint perhaps, what's going wrong, that's blocking your body from losing fat. Sometimes it's exercise based, in many cases it is. But sometimes there's other things that could be preventing you from getting results.

So on the back end of that you're going get some suggestions of things that you can do. If it is exercise related then definitely trying LIFL, Low Intensity Fat Loss would be my recommendation. But try the assessment and see what it says for you.

Jen:                          

Oh that's really exciting, what a cool thing, right? Because we know right? In this fat loss series or in the Weight Loss Code, we know that there's a lot of factors at play. Some of the biggest ones are what we're putting in our mouth, what we're putting in our mind and how much permission we're allowing ourselves to get our body moving.

So yeah, this is awesome. That is it for now. Thank you for watching us. We are going to be continuing the conversation further. Dave I hope that there's a chance you'll be joining us for a Facebook Live to share more, and to talk more and get listeners, viewers questions. If that's something that's going to be interesting. We've got those happening weekly, while this is going on. Or daily I mean, while this is going on.

Thank you for tuning in to this interview. Dave, thank you for being a guest, in this master class series, it's wonderful to have you here.

Dave:                      

Yeah, oh my pleasure. Honestly if there are questions, let's get a bunch of questions, I'd love to come in and do a Facebook Live and just go through those. So yeah.

Jen:                          

Awesome, so stay tuned for that everybody. We'll be letting you know by email when that's happening and in the Facebook group which if you haven't gone to join yet, make sure you do that now.